There’s a digital war of sorts going on in the gaming war. Twitch vs Kick. If you know anything about gaming and/or social media who would have heard of Twitch, no doubt. While Twitch has long reigned as the dominant force in the market, Kick, a newcomer launched in October 2022, is making significant strides to challenge its supremacy. With the backing of Tyler ‘Trainwreck’ Niknam, Kick positions itself as a creator-friendly alternative to established giants like Twitch, YouTube, and Facebook. Trainwreck announced that he’s a co-founder of a new streaming platform backed financially by Stake.com, a sportsbook and online casino that represented some of the most popular gambling streamers. 

A major selling point of Kick is its promise to provide streamers with a more generous share of their earnings compared to Twitch. While Twitch follows a traditional 50-50 revenue split, Kick takes a bold step with a remarkable 95-5 revenue split, significantly benefiting content creators.

As of recently, many streamers migrating to Kick are doing so because they either despise Twitch and all the changes that are being made see dollar signs dancing in their eyes. There was even a promise that Kick would pay every streamer on the site ‘at least something’, regardless of how many viewers they have.

One thing Twitch does have over Kick is more than a decade of experience in the business. The platform has spent that time building up an enormous user base that consists of tens of millions of users – if not more. Since getting started in December 2022, Kick has amassed a core following, but for the most part, its users are looking to jump ship with the dream of making money in the short term. Essentially, there’s very little brand loyalty to Kick – it’s all about the money at the moment.

Twitch maintains its legacy status as the home of gaming and esports streams whereas Kick is focusing much more heavily on Just Chatting streamers and creators that don’t really play games at all. For this reason, it is hard to imagine a future where gaming and esports migrate so heavily to Kick that it cripples Twitch. 

Having said that, Kick is very much still in a growing state. When xQc signed his $100 million contract and moved over to Kick, his first stream brought the platform to its knees, technically speaking. There are plans for things like drop campaigns on Kick, but at present, Twitch Drops are one of the driving reasons behind the ongoing success of the site. 

As for now, streamers are gagging to hear who will join Kick next. It was said that Amouranth joined Kick because she was sick of how Twitch was ‘squeezing streamers’, and that’s the driving reason behind many other content creators leaving the purple platform in favour of the green one.

In recent weeks, Twitch has made some controversial changes, such as announcing a new ‘tier’ called Partner Plus, which awards certain streamers with a higher revenue split but comes with its caveats. There have been changes to the platform’s core ruleset and operating model that have initiated conflict between the site and its creators in the last few months, and it’s hurting the platform immeasurably.

Many also argue that the future of Kick isn’t as bright as many others suggest. Ultimately, as more users join up, it’ll become more saturated, and it’ll be tougher for the platform to sustain the high rates of pay that it has been promising its users for several months. It also looks bizarre sometimes on social media, maintaining a campaign of hatred against Twitch that at times seems juvenile, and some controversial signings have left a foul taste in the mouth of critics the world over.

Twitch has a bigger audience, a more professional platform, a more powerful infrastructure, and the majority share when it comes to gaming and esports broadcasts. It’s still the top-tier platform for those looking to become a streamer, and it’s a familiar and comfortable presence in the industry. It’s hard to imagine it going anywhere, but there’s no doubt that Kick is well and truly hurting Twitch’s leadership team.

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